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Japanese Food

What to get at Ukiah Japanese Smokehouse

Ukiah Japanese Smokehouse sits across the street and adjacent to the Orange Peel in downtown Asheville. You know the spot, the one where it’s hard to keep up with what restaurant is currently there.

Loosely translated into English, Ukiah means, well, Ukiah. There really isn’t a definitive meaning to the word. Look at it backwards though, and it reads Haiku, and therein lies your meaning: structure and balance turned upside down, as the restaurant describes it.

More notable than the name are the credentials of the executive chef behind Ukiah. Dip into his resume and names such as Jean-Georges Vongerichten

Japanese Food

Authentic Japanese cuisine offered at new Festus food truck | Business

The owner of a food truck that has opened in Festus promises to serve up authentic Japanese cuisine.

The Kasabi Japanese Steak & Sushi food truck opened Monday (Aug. 30) and is stationed at 301 S. Adams St.

“We offer sushi and we make homemade sauce,” said Rizky Handana, owner and manager of the business. “We also have (hibachi) steak, shrimp, chicken, also scallops. We have crab rangoon.”

The menu also includes a variety of rolls, like California rolls, Philly rolls, dragon rolls and volcano rolls

“We have bubble tea,” he said. “That’s tea made with tapioca, milk and fruit

Japanese Food

COLUMN: A look at the Japanese food guide | News

This month, 4-H members who are participating in Food, Fun, 4-H are learning about Japanese food.

The “rules of five” in traditional Japanese cooking, or washoku, emphasizes variety and balance. This is achieved using five colors: black, white, red, yellow, and green; five cooking techniques: raw food, grilling, steaming, boiling, and frying; and five flavors: sweet, spicy, salty, sour, and bitter.

These principles can be found even in a single meal of one soup and three sides paired with rice. Japanese side dishes often consist of fish, pickled vegetables, and vegetables cooked in broth. Seafood is a common protein, often

Japanese Food

JINYA Ramen Bar Executes Franchise Deal to Introduce Bold Japanese Cuisine to Indiana

JINYA Ramen Bar Executes Franchise Deal to Introduce Bold Japanese Cuisine to Indiana

Acclaimed Japanese ramen restaurant signs area development agreement to open two restaurants in Indianapolis in early 2022

JINYA Ramen Bar Executes Franchise Deal to Introduce Bold Japanese Cuisine to IndianaIndianapolis, IN  (RestaurantNews.com)  Committed to driving impressive domestic growth in new markets, JINYA Ramen Bar is set to bring its perfectly balanced bowls to The Hoosier State!

The acclaimed Japanese ramen restaurant announced today that it has signed an area development agreement with accomplished franchisee Jason Lam to open two JINYA restaurants in Indianapolis in February 2022.

Lam joins JINYA with 15 years of experience in the restaurant industry and currently owns and operates three different concepts.

“We can’t wait to

Japanese Food

Japanese food giant Kikkoman wants soy sauce to be the ‘ketchup of India’

MUMBAI: Every dish tastes better with a dash of soy sauce, even dessert: That’s the ambitious pitch of Japanese food giant Kikkoman, hoping to persuade Indians to use it in curries, sweets and everything in between.

Convincing 1.3 billion people to add a staple of East Asian cuisine to their butter chicken and samosas is no cakewalk but it will likely be easier than the brand’s 1960s push into the United States.

“When we entered the US, people thought we were selling bug juice because of its dark colour,” Harry Hakuei Kosato, Kikkoman’s India representative, told AFP.

Today the brand’s

Japanese Food

Food: Japanese Giant Kikkoman Wants Soy Sauce To Be The ‘ketchup Of India’


In this picture taken on July 16, 2021 a chef prepares a samosa filling with mince meat with Kikkoman Soy Sauce at the Ishaara restaurant in Mumbai.
Image: Indranil Mukherjee / AFP

Every dish tastes better with a dash of soy sauce, even dessert: that’s the ambitious pitch of Japanese food giant Kikkoman, hoping to persuade Indians to use it in curries, sweets and everything in between.

Convincing 1.3 billion people to add a staple of East Asian cuisine to their butter chicken and samosas is no cakewalk but it will likely be easier than the brand’s 1960s

Japanese Food

From ramen and tofu to Hi-Chew, Japanese food brands boost US investment

TOKYO — Some of Japan’s leading food brands are putting their money where Americans’ mouths are with big investments in U.S. production.

The company behind Maruchan instant ramen, Toyo Suisan, will invest 3 billion yen ($27.3 million) by fiscal 2022 to add new lines at a Texas plant. This comes on the heels of a roughly 5 billion yen expansion there just completed in May.

Driving such capital outlays is robust U.S. consumer spending, which grew an annualized 11.9% on the quarter in the April-June period.

Instant noodles fit the bill for people seeking an easy-to-cook pandemic meal, according to